Archive for the 'Health Insurance' Category

Tax Rebates: Maybe Health Insurance Should Pay Attention!

[Note to my regular readers... starting today, I am beginning my migration to my new blog site:

will get you there. You'll find most of the post here, but you'll need to finish it at the new site -- so -- why not link to it right now? Oh -- and don't forget to change your feed address. New posts will no longer be found here after February 1, 2008]

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So hubby and I are excited about this tax rebate thing… looks like we fit in that middle class group that will get $1200 back from the federal government.

We reflected on the rebate for a few moments, and the thoughts by legislators and the president alike — why they voted “yes.” I share their thoughts with you:

  1. The economy is a mess. We need to make people spend more money to improve it.
  2. If we GIVE them money, they will have more to spend.
  3. We want voters to re-elect us in November , and if we give them money, they will like us and vote for us.

So here’s little old me, wondering the following:

  1. Mr. President and Ms/Mr Legislator — excuse me — but wasn’t that my money to begin with? I sent you a WHOLE lot more than that last year, and I’ll be sending you a WHOLE lot more this year. I don’t believe you are “giving” me anything!
  2. And one other question — where did all this extra money come from that you have to give back to me? All I hear about is the escalating costs of the war in Iraq and the hole that has put in the federal budget. So who exactly are you taking money away from so you can give it back to me?

Those thought processes would be enough to share in today’s post….but…. why stop now?

I got to thinking that health insurers should begin to take a page from the federal government’s book…

Find this entire post at my new blogsite: www.EveryPatientsAdvocate.com/blog

Why Does the US Have the Worst Rate of Preventable Deaths Among Industrialized Nations?

From 2002 to 2003, about 101,000 Americans died from preventable causes ranging from diabetes to bacterial infections and surgical complications, so says a study releases this week.

The reports are based on results from a study undertaken by the Commonwealth Fund, a private New York City based health policy foundation.  The study took place among 19 industrialized nations.  The results were published in the journal, Health Affairs.

The US ended up at the bottom of the preventable death barrel.  France, Japan and Australia were ranked at the top.

Researchers looked at deaths before age 75 from a variety of “amenable” causes which included heart disease, stroke, some cancers, diabetes, bacterial infections, surgical complications and others.  They arrived at a death rate and numbers of patients who died before they might have if they had received “timely and effective healthcare.”

Among the countries reviewed, 64.8 of 100,000 French people died from preventable causes.  And 109.7 of 100,00 Americans died from preventable causes during 2002 – 2003.

The same study was undertaken in 1997-1998, and the US came in 15th then — so it descended to the health system basement since then.  Between the first study and the second study, all of the countries improved their preventable death rates by an average of 16 percent.  Except the US — which improved by only 4 percent.  (That may not be as bad as it sounds since the US’s rate was at a higher level to begin with.)

Why is the US in such bad shape?  Those at the Commonwealth Fund blame access — the fact that 47 million Americans cannot afford insurance or healthcare.  I have no doubt access is a big part of it.  If you can’t afford healthcare, then you don’t seek it out.  Who wants to spend a lot of money on a doctor appointment, only to be told you are sick, when you don’t have the money to treat the sickness anyway.

But I add my own two cents worth of reasons:

First, I believe that part of the answer lies in the way access is handled among those who DO seek help.  We have symptoms, we go to the doctor, and the doctor spends so little time with us that too often, the problem assessment isn’t handled correctly to begin with.  It’s a problem of misdiagnosis and missed diagnosis.  I’d be curious about the correct diagnosis rates among those other industrialized countries.  It only makes sense that people will die if their preventable disease isn’t diagnosed correctly to be begin with — even if it is eventually discovered, it may be too late to treat effectively.  (Yes, I’ll admit, I’m not particularly objective about this part, based on my own experience.)

Second, I believe our American lifestyles lead to preventable death.  We overeat, smoke, drink too much alcohol, drive too fast, live like couch potatoes — and then if we do go to the doctor, we expect the doctor to give us a pill that will fix our bad behaviors.  Please!  One pill won’t fix a lifetime of unhealthy habits.  My curiosity expands to the lifestyles in the other countries that ranked higher than the US.

The Answers for Wise Patients:

A two-pronged attack.  First, begin examining some of your own lifestyle habits to see if you can step up to the health plate yourself.  Don’t blame your doctor or lack of access for your bad choices.

Second, knowing that your doctor will never (in our lifetime) have more time to spend with you, pick up the banner yourself, and begin empowering yourself.  Take responsibility for your own healthcare.  Seek out the doctor when you are prepared to do so.

The truth is — excellent care exists in the US for those who seek it out.  I know the payment system is a barrier.  There is no question about that.  But that’s not going to change anytime soon.  So we patients need to do what we can to improve our own chances.

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MRSA: Victimization and Shooting the Messenger

Yesterday’s post, where I told the stories of three (+2) victims of MRSA infections, raised ire, blame and excuses from commentators and emailers alike.

Never mind that they were stories of five people who are infected with MRSA, one of whom has basically been left to die. Never mind that the frustration levels of these patients while trying to get treatment are over the top. Never mind that these people are victims of dirty medicine — the kind where guidelines and controls exist, but are ignored in too many places. The negative comments were aimed at me — it’s easier, after all, to shoot the messenger.

This post has been moved.  Find it by linking to its new location

Why Your Doctor Won’t Help You

Notice that the title doesn’t say “can’t Help You.”  It says “won’t.”  There’s a big difference.

CPT codes are the stuff a doctor’s practice is made from.  I know — you thought patients were the basis for a physician practice, but no, CPT codes are more important than patients — even though I can guarantee that most doctors wish that was not true.

CPT Codes, Current Procedural Terminology Codes, are all those little numbers that show up on the bill you are handed as you walk out of the doctor’s office.  They are supposed to represent every type of task performed in medicine — from a basic check-up, to diagnosis, to administering a shot, to giving a medical test, to the levels of that test, to surgeries, to anything at all.  They are developed by the AMA, the American Medical Association,  and are intended to be the standard by which all doctors get paid, and all insurance reimburses.  The codes are revised regularly, and new codes are developed by an editorial board that represents the membership of the AMA.

Among the most frustrated of patients I hear from are those who can’t get diagnosed.  There can be a number of reasons for not getting a diagnosis, but one of the big problems is that patients can’t find one central person to review all the evidence.  They are sent from specialist to specialist, each looks at his own tests and results, but they don’t look at results from other doctors, except maybe the one who referred the patient. 

I call this daisy-chaining.  Each doctor represents a link to the answer.  Each link might look at the information from the link it is connected to.  But none of those links review information from links they are not directly connected to.

So what does that have to do with CPT codes?  Plenty.  Because the reason they won’t look at the other records is because there is no code for doing so — therefore — there is no way they can get paid (reimbursed by Medicare or insurance) to look at the big picture for a patient.

Why not?  I have theories, and they all relate to money, of course.  The AMA represents the doctors.  One would think that if doctors wanted to do this kind of big picture diagnosing, or review of other’s notes and reports, then the AMA would develop a code for it, right?  So theory #1 is that doctors don’t want to be doing so.  They don’t want to be responsible for that particular task. 

Theory #2 is that why would the AMA waste its time if insurance won’t cover the cost anyway?  And that’s actually the root of today’s blog.  A review of the new codes for 2008 shows that codes have now been developed for doctors who take phone calls or email from patients.  However, the report includes a caveat that says Medicare and insurance companies won’t be reimbursing for them anyway.

So that explains why your doctor won’t do what you wish he would do — take a comprehensive look at all your health challenges, and help you get diagnosed even after seeing a slew of specialists.   They wish they could — but they can’t.  If they can’t get paid, they can’t stay in business.  If they aren’t in business, then what good does it do for anyone?

I do give a bit of credit to the AMA for at least giving their new codes a shot — it’s a start.  Many more are needed.

But what’s really needed is someone to kick the payers in the backside.  They work for US, afterall — we pay taxes and we pay premiums.  So why aren’t they held accountable to reimburse for all those codes? 

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Want more tools and commentary for sharp patients?
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Join Trisha in the Patient Empowerment Forum at About.com
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Or link here to empower yourself at
EveryPatientsAdvocate.com
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How Supermarket Purchases Violate Your Privacy and Increase the Cost of Insurance

It’s cold and wintery.  Time to hunker down with plenty of comfort food and a toddy or two…  and while we’re at the store, let’s pick up a bottle of aspirin, some stomach acid medicine, and maybe even plenty of dog food for the rottweiler….

A swipe of both your store’s loyalty card (gotta get those discounts!) and of course, your debit card to pay for your goods — and home you go to lay in for the weekend, read a good book, and max out on all that junk food and alcohol.

Come Monday, your purchases, aligned with your identity, will be sold to a health insurer, or life insurance company, perhaps an auto insurance group….  and they will have that information to review should you contact them to make an insurance purchase.

Find the rest of this post at its new location:

http://www.trishatorrey.com/2008/01/03/how-supermarket-purchases-violate-your-privacy-and-increase-the-cost-of-insurance/

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Want more tools and commentary for sharp patients?
Sign up for Every Patient’s Advocate email tips
………………………………………………………………..
Join Trisha in the Patient Empowerment Forum at About.com
………………………………………………………………..
Or link here to empower yourself at
EveryPatientsAdvocate.com
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Health Insurance = Better Health (No kidding)

A report issued this week by JAMA, the Journal of the American Medical Association, reviews a study done by Harvard about the health of Americans and their access to health insurance.

More than 7,000 people ages 55 to 72 were studied. More than 2,200 of them had no health insurance to begin with, but were able to take advantage of Medicare once they turned 65.

Among those who had been uninsured and had cardiac or diabetes problems pre-Medicare coverage, 10 percent had fewer cardiac problems than would have been expected by age 72.

Bottom line, according to the researchers, is that health improves when we have access to health insurance.

Let’s put this one in the no-brainer category! Or — actually — let’s look at it another way:

Healthcare is way too expensive for too many (47 million Americans) to afford. Once you take away that money barrier, they will seek care — and they will be healthier.

My bottom line: This study wasn’t about insurance coverage’s affect on health. It was about removing a barrier.

Which then, of course, begs the question: If removing the barrier to seniors makes them healthier, what could it possibly do for those of us who are healthy to begin with? Maybe keep us healthier throughout our lives? And maybe cost the system less to keep us healthy?

And — doesn’t this make those who vote against SCHIP even bigger scrooges? What do you think about that, George Bush?

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Want more tools and commentary for sharp patients?
Sign up for Every Patient’s Advocate email tips
………………………………………………………………..
Join Trisha in the Patient Empowerment Forum at About.com
………………………………………………………………..
Or link here to empower yourself at
EveryPatientsAdvocate.com
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

. . .This Blog Has Moved!. . .

Where did everything go?

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