Archive for the 'Patient Advocacy' Category

Smoking and Botox — Wishful Thinking and Common Sense

The FDA came out with a report on the negatives of botox injections…

It’s like deja vu, isn’t it?  Where is common sense?

Read this post at About.com, Patient Empowerment.

Why Does the US Have the Worst Rate of Preventable Deaths Among Industrialized Nations?

From 2002 to 2003, about 101,000 Americans died from preventable causes ranging from diabetes to bacterial infections and surgical complications, so says a study releases this week.

The reports are based on results from a study undertaken by the Commonwealth Fund, a private New York City based health policy foundation.  The study took place among 19 industrialized nations.  The results were published in the journal, Health Affairs.

The US ended up at the bottom of the preventable death barrel.  France, Japan and Australia were ranked at the top.

Researchers looked at deaths before age 75 from a variety of “amenable” causes which included heart disease, stroke, some cancers, diabetes, bacterial infections, surgical complications and others.  They arrived at a death rate and numbers of patients who died before they might have if they had received “timely and effective healthcare.”

Among the countries reviewed, 64.8 of 100,000 French people died from preventable causes.  And 109.7 of 100,00 Americans died from preventable causes during 2002 – 2003.

The same study was undertaken in 1997-1998, and the US came in 15th then — so it descended to the health system basement since then.  Between the first study and the second study, all of the countries improved their preventable death rates by an average of 16 percent.  Except the US — which improved by only 4 percent.  (That may not be as bad as it sounds since the US’s rate was at a higher level to begin with.)

Why is the US in such bad shape?  Those at the Commonwealth Fund blame access — the fact that 47 million Americans cannot afford insurance or healthcare.  I have no doubt access is a big part of it.  If you can’t afford healthcare, then you don’t seek it out.  Who wants to spend a lot of money on a doctor appointment, only to be told you are sick, when you don’t have the money to treat the sickness anyway.

But I add my own two cents worth of reasons:

First, I believe that part of the answer lies in the way access is handled among those who DO seek help.  We have symptoms, we go to the doctor, and the doctor spends so little time with us that too often, the problem assessment isn’t handled correctly to begin with.  It’s a problem of misdiagnosis and missed diagnosis.  I’d be curious about the correct diagnosis rates among those other industrialized countries.  It only makes sense that people will die if their preventable disease isn’t diagnosed correctly to be begin with — even if it is eventually discovered, it may be too late to treat effectively.  (Yes, I’ll admit, I’m not particularly objective about this part, based on my own experience.)

Second, I believe our American lifestyles lead to preventable death.  We overeat, smoke, drink too much alcohol, drive too fast, live like couch potatoes — and then if we do go to the doctor, we expect the doctor to give us a pill that will fix our bad behaviors.  Please!  One pill won’t fix a lifetime of unhealthy habits.  My curiosity expands to the lifestyles in the other countries that ranked higher than the US.

The Answers for Wise Patients:

A two-pronged attack.  First, begin examining some of your own lifestyle habits to see if you can step up to the health plate yourself.  Don’t blame your doctor or lack of access for your bad choices.

Second, knowing that your doctor will never (in our lifetime) have more time to spend with you, pick up the banner yourself, and begin empowering yourself.  Take responsibility for your own healthcare.  Seek out the doctor when you are prepared to do so.

The truth is — excellent care exists in the US for those who seek it out.  I know the payment system is a barrier.  There is no question about that.  But that’s not going to change anytime soon.  So we patients need to do what we can to improve our own chances.

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MRSA: Victimization and Shooting the Messenger

Yesterday’s post, where I told the stories of three (+2) victims of MRSA infections, raised ire, blame and excuses from commentators and emailers alike.

Never mind that they were stories of five people who are infected with MRSA, one of whom has basically been left to die. Never mind that the frustration levels of these patients while trying to get treatment are over the top. Never mind that these people are victims of dirty medicine — the kind where guidelines and controls exist, but are ignored in too many places. The negative comments were aimed at me — it’s easier, after all, to shoot the messenger.

This post has been moved.  Find it by linking to its new location

MRSA: Patients Ignored, Left to Die

(Find an update to this post: MRSA, Victimization and Shooting the Messenger)

In the past two days, I have heard three stories, all related to MRSA and other hospital acquired staph infections, and all relating to heinous — even (in my not-so-humble-opinion) criminal acts on the parts of healthcare providers or politicos.

One story came from a colleague who visited a woman in the hospital. The woman contracted an infection after surgery almost a year ago. She is still in the hospital, on life support, not because of the surgery, but because the infection has just consumed her.

This post has been moved. Link here to find it in its new location.

Dad — an Empowered Patient Sets a Fine Example

…. and today is his 81st birthday.

When people ask me how and why I began doing patient advocacy and empowerment work, I first tell them about my misdiagnosis, and then I tell them it’s because I learned how to be an empowered patient from my dad.

Since beginning his battle with cancer in 1986 — yes — more than 21 years ago — Dad has battled his illness every step of the way. From learning everything he could, first through the libraries, then through the Internet, to partnering with his doctors but retaining decision-making for himself, to second guessing problems with a drug he was taking, then figuring out he’d been given the wrong instructions, to doing all the same for my mom to help support her through her Alzheimer’s disease… yes… dad is the epitome of the empowered patient.

Learn more about the steps he has taken here….

Then join me in wishing him a Happy Birthday!

I’m proud of you, Dad…. with love…. from your eldest :-)

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Want more tools and commentary for sharp patients?
Sign up for Every Patient’s Advocate email tips
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Join Trisha in the Patient Empowerment Forum at About.com
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Or link here to empower yourself at
EveryPatientsAdvocate.com
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Health Insurance = Better Health (No kidding)

A report issued this week by JAMA, the Journal of the American Medical Association, reviews a study done by Harvard about the health of Americans and their access to health insurance.

More than 7,000 people ages 55 to 72 were studied. More than 2,200 of them had no health insurance to begin with, but were able to take advantage of Medicare once they turned 65.

Among those who had been uninsured and had cardiac or diabetes problems pre-Medicare coverage, 10 percent had fewer cardiac problems than would have been expected by age 72.

Bottom line, according to the researchers, is that health improves when we have access to health insurance.

Let’s put this one in the no-brainer category! Or — actually — let’s look at it another way:

Healthcare is way too expensive for too many (47 million Americans) to afford. Once you take away that money barrier, they will seek care — and they will be healthier.

My bottom line: This study wasn’t about insurance coverage’s affect on health. It was about removing a barrier.

Which then, of course, begs the question: If removing the barrier to seniors makes them healthier, what could it possibly do for those of us who are healthy to begin with? Maybe keep us healthier throughout our lives? And maybe cost the system less to keep us healthy?

And — doesn’t this make those who vote against SCHIP even bigger scrooges? What do you think about that, George Bush?

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Want more tools and commentary for sharp patients?
Sign up for Every Patient’s Advocate email tips
………………………………………………………………..
Join Trisha in the Patient Empowerment Forum at About.com
………………………………………………………………..
Or link here to empower yourself at
EveryPatientsAdvocate.com
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