Archive for the 'About.com' Category

Smoking and Botox — Wishful Thinking and Common Sense

The FDA came out with a report on the negatives of botox injections…

It’s like deja vu, isn’t it?  Where is common sense?

Read this post at About.com, Patient Empowerment.

ABC’s Eli Stone — Gotta Love a Little Controversy

I’ve watched and heard plenty of controversy from those who are either upset, or elated, that ABC will be airing an episode of its new TV show, Eli Stone, tomorrow night.

Eli Stone is a lawyer who defends a lawsuit imposed by a family who believes that a vaccination caused their child to develop autism.

From the American Association of Pediatrics which believes (like the CDC, the IOM and other government and mainstream groups) that vaccines do NOT cause autism) to groups of parents and professionals who believe vaccines are at the root of autism…. they are riled up and making plenty of noise.

The AAP wrote a letter to ABC insisting the episode not be aired. The parent-group that shares the autism-vaccine correlation beliefs insists it be shown.

And my take on the controversy? It’s completely unrelated to autism, vaccinations or anything related to health or medicine….

Read what I had to say on About.com.

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Doctors Protect Colleagues at Patient Expense

One of the questions I am asked frequently is about the best way to find the right doctor for a second opinion. That question — and its answer — have become among the most important answers I’ve ever provided, ever since the proof of my answer was provided in the results of a study last week by the Institute of Medicine as a Profession (IMAP.)

How many times have you heard that advice — get a second opinion! It’s important to do so if you will ever need any type of difficult or invasive treatment for your medical problem. Long term drugs, drugs with difficult side effects, any type of surgical procedure or any procedure which will have a long term effect on you — yes — you need a second opinion.

Why? Two reasons. First, to make sure your diagnosis is correct. Second, to make sure you know about all the treatment options, have someone to discuss them with, and can then choose the one you have the most confidence in according to your own goals for the treatment.

The advice I give? Never ever ever see a second opinion doctor who has any relationship to the first opinion doctor. Don’t see a second doctor from the same practice, from the same building, from the same hospital, from the same country club, from the same neighborhood, from the same bowling league — you get the idea. The idea is that they can’t be friends or close colleagues.

Why? Because two friends won’t contradict each other. Your number two will rarely give you different answers from your number one doctor if they know each other and respect each other. Knowing that, then you also understand that your number two won’t be as objective as necessary and if you need anything at all when you are being diagnosed and decisions are being made for treatment, then you know you need objectivity!

The study done by IMAP proves this point. Without going into all the details, the bottom line is that too many doctors talk out of both sides of their mouths. While, on the one hand, 98 percent of them say that medical errors should most definitely be reported, 46 percent said they had witnessed an error and had not reported it.

Why didn’t they report those errors?  Because they were committed by a friend, or close colleague, or a business partner or even just the guy down the hall.

Hmmm… a major ethical disconnect if you ask me.

You’ve seen me type it before: trust, but verify. A second opinion is absolutely necessary. We want to believe that our doctors are not the ones who do these unethical, and possibly dangerous things. But it turns out that about half talk out of both sides of their mouths. That means if you have seen two doctors, then one of them fit that unethical profile. If you’ve seen 10 doctors, then five of them do.

A second opinion from someone with no relationship to your first opinion doctor may be lifesaving in its objectivity.

Read more, and get more details on my About.com blog.

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Is Your Doctor the Right Religion?

Or the right gender?

Or the right color?

Or does s/he have the right sexual preference?

Or any of a number of other attributes that make your doctor the right doctor for you?

Wait a minute — are these attributes relevant?

This question came to mind today after a conversation with a friend who is gay. He told me about an experience when he went for a checkup that just blew his mind…. a discussion of relevance ensued.

Read about the conversation — and then join the discussion!

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Patient Empowerment on About.com

This is the announcement I’ve been waiting to make to you, and it’s finally time to spring it….

I’m pleased to tell you that as of Friday, About.com has launched a new site for Patient Empowerment — and yours truly is the expert behind the scenes.

aboutlogo.gif

About.com is owned by the New York Times — and has some impressive credentials:

  • About.com is one of the 15 most visited Web sites in the US
  • About.com is a top-ten content site
  • Every month, 34 million unique visitors in the U.S. (average; Nielsen//NetRatings) and 51 million worldwide (average: About metrics)
  • About.com’s content is created by a network of more than 600 Guides. These people are passionate about their topic areas, and have deep expertise and credentials in their fields. Guides make sure our visitors find answers and advice that are personally relevant, credible, and useful – all delivered in a human, accessible voice.
  • About.com is a “companion to your news” site, providing depth and breadth behind current topics

A big benefit to those with interest is the fact that we will have an ongoing forum on any topic of interest related to healthcare delivery — the good and the ugly.

Yes, this personal blog will continue. This blog and the one at About.com will cover different topics on any given day, so you’ll want to check them both. Comment on them, too!

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From the desk of (12/1/07)…

Miscellany from the week, not requiring full posts on their own….fromthedeskof.gif

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My big news is ready to be sprung! Although, through today’s blog, I’ll announce it “softly” — a bigger announcement is in the works for this week.

You may be familiar with About.com — tens or hundreds of millions of visitors each month go there to learn about 600+ topics of interest ranging from Women’s Issues to Fishing to Poker to Fashion to Football — and now — patient empowerment!

Yes — as of yesterday afternoon, the new About.com Guide to Patient Empowerment was launched — and yours truly is the expert/guide. Take a stroll on over! Let me know what you think! Join the forum so we can chat! And if you ever want to touch base, just link on my name at the top — my email address is right there.

The web address is: http://patients.about.com Why not bookmark it or add it to your favorites?

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An interesting report on the Thursday evening NBC news about differences in the way African American women are diagnosed, treated, provided with preventive medicine, etc…. It actually strikes me as the next revelation in the fact that medical research just can’t be generalized. First we learn that women require different diagnosing and treatment from men for problems like heart disease. Then we’re told that children can’t take smaller doses of adult drugs because “children are not simply small adults.” And now we learn that genetic makeup related to skin color affects the success of diagnosis and treatment as well.

What others are we missing?

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Has anyone else noticed this? Everytime I turn around — for the past several weeks — there have been more ads for health insurance on the TV, in the newspaper. From those plans that “pay you back” to supplemental plans for Medicare…. they must be spending millions if not billions.

Wouldn’t our premiums be lower if they didn’t spend so much on advertising?

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Today is World AIDS Day and it seems there’s not much mention of it in the press. My cousin Tim has AIDS. Tim is in his 50s. As a younger man he was a vibrant and talented actor, appearing in everything from plays to a soap opera in England back in the 1970s. Now, in these later years, Tim is a slave to the medications that keep him alive and by his own estimation, he doesn’t feel like his life has much quality.

My thoughts and prayers are with Tim and others who suffer through such a horrible disease.

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Where did everything go?

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We just relocated, that's all.

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