Archive for the 'Patient Safety' Category

Smoking and Botox — Wishful Thinking and Common Sense

The FDA came out with a report on the negatives of botox injections…

It’s like deja vu, isn’t it?  Where is common sense?

Read this post at About.com, Patient Empowerment.

ABC’s Eli Stone — Gotta Love a Little Controversy

I’ve watched and heard plenty of controversy from those who are either upset, or elated, that ABC will be airing an episode of its new TV show, Eli Stone, tomorrow night.

Eli Stone is a lawyer who defends a lawsuit imposed by a family who believes that a vaccination caused their child to develop autism.

From the American Association of Pediatrics which believes (like the CDC, the IOM and other government and mainstream groups) that vaccines do NOT cause autism) to groups of parents and professionals who believe vaccines are at the root of autism…. they are riled up and making plenty of noise.

The AAP wrote a letter to ABC insisting the episode not be aired. The parent-group that shares the autism-vaccine correlation beliefs insists it be shown.

And my take on the controversy? It’s completely unrelated to autism, vaccinations or anything related to health or medicine….

Read what I had to say on About.com.

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Why Does the US Have the Worst Rate of Preventable Deaths Among Industrialized Nations?

From 2002 to 2003, about 101,000 Americans died from preventable causes ranging from diabetes to bacterial infections and surgical complications, so says a study releases this week.

The reports are based on results from a study undertaken by the Commonwealth Fund, a private New York City based health policy foundation.  The study took place among 19 industrialized nations.  The results were published in the journal, Health Affairs.

The US ended up at the bottom of the preventable death barrel.  France, Japan and Australia were ranked at the top.

Researchers looked at deaths before age 75 from a variety of “amenable” causes which included heart disease, stroke, some cancers, diabetes, bacterial infections, surgical complications and others.  They arrived at a death rate and numbers of patients who died before they might have if they had received “timely and effective healthcare.”

Among the countries reviewed, 64.8 of 100,000 French people died from preventable causes.  And 109.7 of 100,00 Americans died from preventable causes during 2002 – 2003.

The same study was undertaken in 1997-1998, and the US came in 15th then — so it descended to the health system basement since then.  Between the first study and the second study, all of the countries improved their preventable death rates by an average of 16 percent.  Except the US — which improved by only 4 percent.  (That may not be as bad as it sounds since the US’s rate was at a higher level to begin with.)

Why is the US in such bad shape?  Those at the Commonwealth Fund blame access — the fact that 47 million Americans cannot afford insurance or healthcare.  I have no doubt access is a big part of it.  If you can’t afford healthcare, then you don’t seek it out.  Who wants to spend a lot of money on a doctor appointment, only to be told you are sick, when you don’t have the money to treat the sickness anyway.

But I add my own two cents worth of reasons:

First, I believe that part of the answer lies in the way access is handled among those who DO seek help.  We have symptoms, we go to the doctor, and the doctor spends so little time with us that too often, the problem assessment isn’t handled correctly to begin with.  It’s a problem of misdiagnosis and missed diagnosis.  I’d be curious about the correct diagnosis rates among those other industrialized countries.  It only makes sense that people will die if their preventable disease isn’t diagnosed correctly to be begin with — even if it is eventually discovered, it may be too late to treat effectively.  (Yes, I’ll admit, I’m not particularly objective about this part, based on my own experience.)

Second, I believe our American lifestyles lead to preventable death.  We overeat, smoke, drink too much alcohol, drive too fast, live like couch potatoes — and then if we do go to the doctor, we expect the doctor to give us a pill that will fix our bad behaviors.  Please!  One pill won’t fix a lifetime of unhealthy habits.  My curiosity expands to the lifestyles in the other countries that ranked higher than the US.

The Answers for Wise Patients:

A two-pronged attack.  First, begin examining some of your own lifestyle habits to see if you can step up to the health plate yourself.  Don’t blame your doctor or lack of access for your bad choices.

Second, knowing that your doctor will never (in our lifetime) have more time to spend with you, pick up the banner yourself, and begin empowering yourself.  Take responsibility for your own healthcare.  Seek out the doctor when you are prepared to do so.

The truth is — excellent care exists in the US for those who seek it out.  I know the payment system is a barrier.  There is no question about that.  But that’s not going to change anytime soon.  So we patients need to do what we can to improve our own chances.

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MRSA: Victimization and Shooting the Messenger

Yesterday’s post, where I told the stories of three (+2) victims of MRSA infections, raised ire, blame and excuses from commentators and emailers alike.

Never mind that they were stories of five people who are infected with MRSA, one of whom has basically been left to die. Never mind that the frustration levels of these patients while trying to get treatment are over the top. Never mind that these people are victims of dirty medicine — the kind where guidelines and controls exist, but are ignored in too many places. The negative comments were aimed at me — it’s easier, after all, to shoot the messenger.

This post has been moved.  Find it by linking to its new location

MRSA: Patients Ignored, Left to Die

(Find an update to this post: MRSA, Victimization and Shooting the Messenger)

In the past two days, I have heard three stories, all related to MRSA and other hospital acquired staph infections, and all relating to heinous — even (in my not-so-humble-opinion) criminal acts on the parts of healthcare providers or politicos.

One story came from a colleague who visited a woman in the hospital. The woman contracted an infection after surgery almost a year ago. She is still in the hospital, on life support, not because of the surgery, but because the infection has just consumed her.

This post has been moved. Link here to find it in its new location.

When Your Doctor Fakes You Out

Empowered patients will be interested in a report today on the study results of a survey of Chicago area internists (family doctors). It seems that 45% of them see nothing wrong in prescribing placebos — fake sugar pills — for their patients.

The report actually tiptoes around what the results really mean. The spinmeisters had their say with phrases like, ” this study suggests that placebos themselves are viewed as therapeutic tools in medical practice” and “a growing number of physicians believe in mind-body connection.”

Yes — I do understand that sometimes the mind triumphs over matter — and I do understand the mind-body connection theories. I’m a believer.

I don’t bring this up because I think patients shouldn’t be given what works — and if a sugar pill will help the pain or symptoms go away — then OK. But that is NOT why doctors are giving their patients sugar pills.

Instead I see these results as proof that doctors don’t care to take the time to figure out what is really wrong with a patient and that, too often, a placebo is simply the answer to “there, there, little lady — it’s all in your head.” If you could read my email, you’d believe the same thing.

The fact that 45% of doctors would be willing to sacrifice their patients’ potential health by ignoring real symptoms or not treating them accurately is just one more reason why trust continues to erode between patients and their doctors.

And if they think the sugar pills can really help a patient? Then they should tell them that’s what it is. According to this report, that is most often obscured.

Check your medicine cabinet. If you find something labled Obecalp (which is placebo backwards) or Cepocab — which is a pill made of lactose, a natural sugar, and can be prescribed and filled at pharmacies everywhere — then your doctor has prescribed a placebo for you.

Ethical? Unethical? What do you call it when someone pulls the wool over your eyes?

If you’d like to read more, you can do so here.

Wise patients know that asking plenty of questions is the best approach to making sure they aren’t victims of a placebo prescription. When your doctor writes a prescription, there are definite steps that can be taken to verify that the prescription is bonafide, that it’s the right drug for the right problem, and what to expect when you take it.

Wise patients work to make sure they aren’t being fooled.

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