Archive for the 'Pharmaceutical Drugs' Category

Smoking and Botox — Wishful Thinking and Common Sense

The FDA came out with a report on the negatives of botox injections…

It’s like deja vu, isn’t it?  Where is common sense?

Read this post at About.com, Patient Empowerment.

Dad — an Empowered Patient Sets a Fine Example

…. and today is his 81st birthday.

When people ask me how and why I began doing patient advocacy and empowerment work, I first tell them about my misdiagnosis, and then I tell them it’s because I learned how to be an empowered patient from my dad.

Since beginning his battle with cancer in 1986 — yes — more than 21 years ago — Dad has battled his illness every step of the way. From learning everything he could, first through the libraries, then through the Internet, to partnering with his doctors but retaining decision-making for himself, to second guessing problems with a drug he was taking, then figuring out he’d been given the wrong instructions, to doing all the same for my mom to help support her through her Alzheimer’s disease… yes… dad is the epitome of the empowered patient.

Learn more about the steps he has taken here….

Then join me in wishing him a Happy Birthday!

I’m proud of you, Dad…. with love…. from your eldest 🙂

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Overcoming the Doctor-Patient War of Words

I seem to have hit a nerve with my post about Dr. Steve Cole’s editorial published a few days ago. Dr. Cole asserted that the reason healthcare costs are going up is because doctors have learned to milk the system in ways related to how they order tests, prescribe meds and other tasks which allow them to use billing codes that get reimbursed by insurance at a higher rate.

Wow! Here are a few of the post outcomes:

  • My blog hits doubled.
  • The number of comments to the post doubled over my highest day previously.
  • Several doctors — those who commented and those who emailed — were ready to shoot the messengers — both Dr. Cole and me!
  • Some doctors agreed with Dr. Cole.
  • Some doctors vehemently disagreed.
  • And patients — always the ones who find themselves at the bottom of the totem pole, once again feel victimized by the whole sorry situation, regardless of how it came about or how it’s being handled.

As your friendly — and peace loving — Every Patient’s Advocate — let me raise a few points and clarifications:

There are many reasons the costs of healthcare are increasing. Dr. Cole offered one set of reasons but certainly not all of them. Others include the wish for private insurance to profit more and more, the too-high costs of drugs, the bad habits of patients which require more care to “fix” them (like smoking, obesity and others), the increasing healthcare costs of an aging baby boomer population, the fact that people are living longer, meaning they need higher priced care longer, the higher costs of advanced technology, and others. One commenter to the blog (justordinaryjoe) took a stab at this master list and did a good job at it.

What truly upsets me — UPSETS ME — is that somehow this translates to a them-vs-us discussion. Doctors VERSUS patients or patients VERSUS doctors. We’ve lost the “and” — and that, to me, is frightening and dangerous. This is not about a conflict. But it is about a loss of trust.

But a patient’s loss of trust in his/her doctor is not the trust that should be lost. The patient AND the doctor should be focusing their lack of trust on the very system that has created it. That’s what is broken — the system of healthcare in America. And it won’t be doctors or patients who can fix it, even though it’s doctors and patients who pay the highest price.

Recognizing that it’s the system — and not the doctors and patients — then we patients must work harder to collaborate with our doctors, and doctors must work harder to collaborate — and respect — patients. Here are some of the ways that can happen:

1. Respect for TIME: Time is money. And the respect for time is one of the biggest violations.

Doctors — PLEASE respect the time of your patients. Give them your 100 percent attention during those brief six or eight minutes you will see them. And don’t make them wait in waiting rooms for more than 10 minutes. After 10 minutes, it is a violation of your patient’s time.

And patients — PLEASE respect your doctor’s time. He can’t make a living (and yes, I’m serious about that) if you impose on his time for more than you deserve. Granted, you are hiring him to do a job for you. But you aren’t paying him out of your pocket — and you just can’t have ALL the time you want — so be concise, be specific, ask targeted questions and move on.

2. Respect for KNOWLEDGE

Doctors — you don’t have a corner on all the knowledge. Please respect that patients know their own bodies better than you do. Don’t try to fit their square problems into your round holes. Understand that the internet does yield ideas for them and be willing to discuss them, even if they seem ludicrous to you.

Patients — your doctor spent up to 12 years gaining the medical education needed to accurately diagnose and treat you. Don’t think that by spending an hour or two on the internet, or by talking to other people, that you can trump that education. Ask for help in translating new information you learn… and do so with….
3. Respect for the COLLABORATIVE PROCESS: Getting to WELL is not one sided.
Doctors — please don’t jump to conclusions. Doctors must work WITH their patients — not AT them. And never EVER (well, OK, hardly ever) tell any patient that a malady is all in her head! (see RESPECT below.)

And Patients — make sure you participate collaboratively, too. Ask questions that allow you to assess possibilities, ask more questions, and arrive at a decision WITH your doctor, not just because your doctor tells you that it’s the “best” answer for you. YOU are the only person who can determine the best answer for you.

4. Respect for DECISION-MAKING

Patients — YOU are the people with the responsibility for making decisions about your own bodies (and, in terms of advanced directives, your own demise.) You need to step up to that plate to do so. Don’t just default to what the doctor recommends. Ask instead for a good review of ALL your treatment options, the pros and cons of each, and then make as objective a decision possible based on that input.

Doctors — don’t abbreviate the list of options you give a patient just because you think others aren’t good options. (And a message to many — don’t try to tell me that doesn’t happen, because even if you don’t do it, you know it happens with your colleagues.)

5. Respect for…. RESPECT

Doctors — working with a patient does not allow you to judge him or her. I wish I had a nickel for every time a patient has said, “The doctor just laughed at me.” or “I was so insulted!” A patient comes to you for help and counsel — not for your judgment. You need to treat that patient respectfully.

Patients — and I’m serious about this — the only time you need to respect your doctor is if that doctor deserves respect. If your doctor laughs at you or insults you, or in some way makes you feel like less than the respect-deserving person you are — say something! And if you can’t muster the ability to say something, then send them a report card and tell them. And — if necessary — find yourself another doctor.

And the bottom line is:
Doctors: please make sure your patients understand and experience the respect they deserve. For most of you, this is a daily occurrence. But we all know that for many, it’s not even on their radar.

Patients: stop expecting your doctors to be gods who can overcome a broken system to help you get the medical attention you need. For most doctors are truly doing the best they can. And it’s up to you to weed out the ones who aren’t — and walk away.

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Want more tools and commentary for sharp patients?
Sign up for Every Patient’s Advocate email tips
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Join Trisha in the Patient Empowerment Forum at About.com
………………………………………………………………..
Or link here to empower yourself at
EveryPatientsAdvocate.com
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10 Things Your Physician Won’t Tell You…

…. and I can’t take credit for them.

Check out this article in Smart Money magazine

You’ll learn from it, as scary as that is.

Then read my commentary here.

Yanking the Cure Rug Out From Under Lymphoma Patients

In the continuing saga of two “miracle” drugs for those who suffer from non-Hodgkins lymphomas… the fifth most common cancer….

I told you six months ago about Bexxar and Zevalin, the two drugs which can treat non-Hodgkins lymphoma but were not being promoted by oncologists in private practice because they cannot, by law, administer it. That means they cannot profit by it. Remembering that American Healthcare is not about health or care, it’s about sickness and money…. we learned then that these drugs must be administered in (usually academic) medical centers because they have a radioactive component to them. So many oncologists provide infusion services themselves, but are not allowed to administer these two drugs, so they don’t tell their patients about them. I remain angry about that subject.

As if that weren’t difficult enough, there is now a new twist to this story, making it even more difficult for lymphoma patients to get this treatment they need — and deserve to have. According to the New York Times, Medicare has decided to reimburse administration of this drug in 2008 at about half the cost of the drug. Medicare made that determination, it says, based on what hospitals have been billing Medicare for the drug — but hospitals dispute that, saying they would never request reimbursement that would cost them almost $10,000 per patient! Patients need only one treatment, but it’s very expensive because the drug itself is very expensive.

Both hospitals and the manufacturers are confused as to how Medicare put together its reimbursement schedule. They believe errors have been made, and that Medicare’s numbers are wrong.

So here’s how this begins to domino….

Find the rest of this post at the new location of the Every Patient’s Advocate blog….


http://trishatorrey.com/2007/12/13/yanking-the-cure-rug-out-from-under-lymphoma-patients/

Psych Drugs, Shady Practices and One Fixer

In 2003, after taking Zoloft for six weeks to help him sleep, Woody Witczak, a vivacious, intelligent, energetic and happy man, hung himself — and died.

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Last evening I leafed through my December issue of Consumer Reports. There on page 65 was my friend and colleague Kim Witczak, Woody’s widow, and one of the most active fixers I know.

The article featured Kim’s work to clean up the rules by which drugs get approved by the FDA. Since Woody took his own life, and because it seemed so completely outside anything Woody ever would have done, Kim knew there must be some kind of dark force, some kind of shady coverup that contributed to the tragedy.

She learned several things. She learned that Zoloft is an antidepressant, not a sleep aid, and it had been prescribed to Woody “off-label.” Woody had just begun working at his dream job. His sleeping problems were related to his excitement and overwork — not depression problems. Kim questioned how Zoloft could have been prescribed for him.

Digging further, she learned a few things about Zoloft and even more about the FDA and its approval process for new drugs. Included were the following: pharmaceutical manufacturers could apply for approval to make drugs available to patients by showcasing only those clinical trials that show the drugs “work.” They were able to cover up any others that didn’t work out so favorably. Also, once a drug was approved, the FDA could request follow up studies, but had no way of enforcing those requests.

It also turns out that among the people who have the power to approve or disapprove any given drug, are people who may benefit financially from the sale of the drug. Think about that for a moment…. A panel of professionals is supposed to objectively determine whether a pharma company can make millions or billions of dollars on a drug — and some of those people will be the ones who make money when it’s sold.

Objective? I think not.

And here’s a big one, too — more than half the FDA’s budget for considering whether or not drugs should be approved comes from the fees paid to them by the pharma companies. So, when paired with the revelation above about who sits on the review panels?

Scary, isn’t it?

In September, the laws changed for how drugs will get approved, and what follow up will be required. The law goes into effect within 18 months. Kim was a large force in getting the changes made, as was Consumer’s Union, the publisher of Consumer Reports.

The changes affected were: All clinical trials used to prove a drug is — or isn’t — safe will be made public. There will be some new regulations on the drug ads we see. All print ads will have a toll free number and a web address to help consumers report problems. The numbers of reviewers on the approval panel with ties to drug companies will be reduced (but not eliminated). But no change has been made to how the FDA’s budget is put together — meaning — approvals will continue to be influenced by contributions made by the pharma companies seeking those approvals.

There’s not much of a message here for us as individual patients and consumers — except — to be thankful we have people like Kim Witczak who take their pain and suffering from the loss of a loved one and turn it away from blaming and into fixing. You can learn more at Kim’s website, WoodyMatters.org .

Healthcare will be safer because of Kim’s work, and that of Consumer’s Union, too. Fixers at their finest.

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Kickbacks: Doctors, Pharma, Insurance and Surprise! Patients Caught in the Middle

See if you can get your arms around the following conundrum, which is typical of our dysfunctional American Healthcare System — only this time with a twist. We’ll begin with point-of-view:

Consumers (that’s us patients!): When we need a prescription drug to improve our health, we want the best drug for what ails us, at the lowest price possible. We also want affordable health insurance, with fair co-pays for those drugs.

Physicians: When it comes time to prescribing a drug for a patient, the doctor wants to be sure it’s the right drug with the best chance of improving the patient’s health. Further, the physician is also on the constant lookout for ways to increase his/her income. They are offered money, support and/or other incentives from pharma manufacturers on a constant basis, but this practice has become a real point of contention because it creates a conflict of interest. Now, for many, a possible new income stream has been offered by insurance companies (see below.)

Pharma companies: Are interested in maximizing income. Period. And they will do whatever they can to protect that interest. Their real allegiance is to their stockholders who may also be any of the players mentioned here. The great majority of their income is derived from branded/innovator drugs and they take a huge hit when their patents run out and they begin to compete against generics. They look for ways to reward doctors for prescribing and using their drugs.

Insurance companies: Are interested in maximizing income. Period. And they will do whatever they can to protect that interest. Even the not-for-profits want to maximize their income so they can pay out bigger bonuses to their top people. They are constantly on the lookout for ways to reduce their costs so their profits are larger. When they can get doctors to switch patients to generic drugs, (or when they can get patients to ask their doctors about the possibility) then they can save costs.

Some background:

Read the rest of this post at its new location:

http://www.trishatorrey.com/2007/11/26/kickbacks-doctors-pharma-insurance-and-surprise-patients-caught-in-the-middle/

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